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I would like to say,

B is not so frequent as A.

Is it okay to say,

'B is much more rarely?'

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    with the verb is the subject complement must be an adjective, "rare", comparative would be "rarer" or "more rare". If you change the verb to happens as in Robusto's answer, then you can use an adverb. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 25 '17 at 14:01
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo I stole your comment for my answer, I hope you're OK with that?! – SteveES Apr 25 '17 at 14:59
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    Not a problem, @SteveES. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 25 '17 at 15:07
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There are several problems with the phrase you want to use. The first, and most glaring problem is the one pointed out in TRomano's comment:

"With the verb is the subject complement must be an adjective, "rare", comparative would be "rarer" or "more rare". If you change the verb to happens as in Robusto's answer, then you can use an adverb." - Tᴚoɯɐuo

Given that you are talking about the frequency of an event, "happens" is probably more appropriate than "is". If you were talking about the comparative prevalence of a thing, then the verb be would be more appropriate, e.g.

Red squirrels are much rarer than grey ones.

The second problem is that you are using a comparison, but are not comparing "B" to anything. You should either compare "B" to "A", or just make a statement about "B" (e.g. "B is very rare", or "B happens very rarely").

The third, more subtle "problem", is the jarring effect from combining "more ... than", which is usually used to mean a larger amount of something, with "rarely", which means something happens less often. As Robusto says in their answer, you might prefer to use "much less often" instead. I should point out that it is not grammatically "wrong" or unidiomatic, so you may use it if you wish.

So, I would say the best way of saying what you want is either:

B is much rarer than A. (If A and B are things)

B happens much less often than A. (If A and B are events)

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If you have a problem with "much more rarely" you could try "much less often":

B happens much less often than A.

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