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can anybody explain me the difference in usage of these three?

For example, is it correct to ask: How many cars did you buy last two days or How many cars did you buy in the last two days?

  • is there a difference in meaning if I say: How many cars did you buy in the last two days vs. How many cars have you bought in the last two days?

Does present perfect include today ? For example if I say: How many cars have you bought in the last two days? The person will tell me how many cars he bought today and yesterday? Or he would tell me how many cars he bought yesterday and the day before yesterday?

If doctor asks me how have you been feeling in the last 2 days/for the last 2 days. He means today + yesterday or yesterday + the day before yesterday?

In my country we also have this kind of grammar.

For example we can say here something like. Last two days I am worrying too much. By which we mean that I was worrying yesterday and I am worrying today too. Can I use it the same way in English?

Thanks, if there is any resource about this grammar rules online, I would like to have a look thanks!

marked as duplicate by ColleenV Nov 7 '17 at 23:05

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Where referring to a period of time, you generally have to use a word that places the context: "during / in / over / for the last two days"

During, and over are the most straightforward, merely meaning "within that time" during/over the past two days I did nothing but watch dvds

In, to me, creates a slight feeling of separating that time out from its surrounding time "in the last two days I somehow gained 10 kilos"

Your understanding is correct: for the last two days I've been out of my mind with worry, i.e. I worried all yesterday and today, pretty much non-stop.

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