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I am writing this sentence in my diary:

We will visit Country A next month. It is always wonderful to be with Jan for a tour in Country A.

Shall I use the future tense or is it still grammatical to use the present tense in this case?

It will be always wonderful to be with Jan for a tour in the Country A.

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Present tense is fine for expressing a thing that is always true, even when the frame-of-reference is the future.

I'm visiting Jan next week. It is always good to see her.

But "it will always be wonderful to be with Jan" is not idiomatic, at least not in the typical context where you're wanting to say that it is always good to be with Jan. You would use the future in that way only if you're heavily stressing the fact that you never expect that to change.

The rich get richer and the poor get poorer, and it will always be that way.

I've known Jan since childhood. It is always good to see her (or him), and I cannot imagine us ever falling out, since we are such good friends. It will always be wonderful to see Jan.

  • Not sure if this is relevant or the same, but I think similar thing is present in "zero conditional". – luk32 Apr 30 '17 at 23:14
  • It is also used for repeated actions. "They mow the lawn on Saturday" means "They mow the lawn every week on Saturday," but "They will mow the lawn on Saturday" refers to a single event in the future. – alephzero May 1 '17 at 0:31

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