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Profanity is socially offensive language. What is language free from cursewords. Is there a word to express the opposite concept of profanity? Should I use simply politeness here or is there a more sophisticated word to cover this concept in the following sentences?

[the word] is an important quality which needs to be internalized in children in young age.

Consider [the word] seriously in this place. They won't take it easy in here.

(On a sign in a public place): Please Observe [the word]

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    @Tᴚoɯɐuo On forums people often use: family-friendly language.. ;) – WRX May 1 '17 at 20:21
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    "I don't know how to say it using polite language". – WS2 May 1 '17 at 21:05
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    BTW, "at a young age" or "while young", not "in young age". – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 2 '17 at 15:08
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propriety Google Dictionary

pro·pri·e·ty p(r)əˈprīədē/ noun

the state or quality of conforming to conventionally accepted standards of behavior or morals. "he always behaved with the utmost propriety"

synonyms: decorum, respectability, decency, correctness, protocol, appropriateness, suitability, good manners, courtesy, politeness, rectitude, morality, civility, modesty, demureness;

the details or rules of behavior conventionally considered to be correct.

plural noun: proprieties

"she's a great one for the proprieties"

the condition of being right, appropriate, or fitting.

"they questioned the propriety of certain investments made by the council"

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The words like decency, politeness, respectfulness, etc. can always be used as antonyms of profanity.

Decency is an important quality which needs to be internalized in children in young age.

Consider moral attitude seriously in this place. They won't take it easy in here.

(On a sign in a public place): Please Observe Respectful Behavior.

When in doubt, you can always resort to using "profanity" itself. For example in the second sentence,

Seriously refrain from profanity in this place. They won't take it easy in here.

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If you're open to phrases, the closest I could think of was respectful language or respectful discourse. This is often used in schools to tell kids not to curse. However, it encompasses more than just a lack of curse words. It also includes not using language that is disrespectful, hateful, offensive, etc based on race, religion, sexual orientation, or other groups targeted by prejudice and discrimination.

Two possible alternatives are clean language* and polite language. Clean is used when the curse words have been censored in a song, often "clean version".
One of the dictionary entries is

  1. inoffensive in language or content; without obscenity. (Dictionary.com)

Polite again would include more than just lack of curse words. It would include other well-manner, refined language.

Three more less formal alternatives are PG language, G-rated language or family-friendly language (as @Willow suggests).

PG and G-rated come from the MPAA film ratings.

  • PG Rating
    A PG movie rating stands for Parental Guidance, as some material may not be suitable for children. There may be mild strong language and some violence, but there will not be substance use or abuse.
    (ThoughtCo.)
  • g-rated
    1 : having a rating of G; broadly : relating to or characterized by a lack of violence, obscenity, or sexual explicitness • a G-rated novel
    2 : innocent, clean • G-rated fun
    (M-W)

In common usage, PG is used to say no curse words, especially strong curses, like the F and S words. It could also suggest language without other obscene materials. Example: Hey, keep it PG!

As it suggests, family-friendly language suggests that it is suitable for families. It would imply no curse words, but again, it could also suggest language without other obscene materials.


* A cursory Google search shows that this has some kind of special meaning in psychology, but the context should clarify that you're talking about language without profanity.

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The other answers are better options for colloquial use, but the word profane simply refers to things that are not sacred.

As a result, the opposite of profanity is also sanctity.

However, common usage has pushed profane to mean vulgar and offensive, so sanctity might now be too extreme of an opposite.

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