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Example sentence:

He had an accident. From then on, he couldn’t talk to me, nor could I listen to him anymore. Until now.

I guess it's grammatical and idiomatic. But I'm not very sure due to the change of tense in the same paragraph.

(Or maybe a more natural construction is: From then on ... And it's the same now?)

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"From then on" indicates that the event in question is continuing, while "Until now" indicates that the event in question has had some kind of change (in this case, stopping).

Decoding the sentences from there, there was a period of time, beginning when the accident happened and ending now, that the two didn't talk to each other.

Your suggestion of replacing "Until now" with "And it's the same now" actually reverses the scenario, because "And it's the same now" indicates that the event in question is still continuing now.

  • So with "And it's the same now" I have a valid construction? – alex May 3 '17 at 1:17
  • If you're trying to convey that the event in question (the two not talking to each other) is still ongoing, then "And it's the same now" is redundant. The entire segment actually works better without it at all. – Alexander May 3 '17 at 3:24

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