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Are they have the same meaning? I'm not confident/sure they are same.

Ex.

"We have an active shooter," a different woman says in another 911 call. "We have a child down."

"We have got an active shooter," a different woman says in another 911 call. "We have got a child down."

I copied it from http://abcnews.go.com/US/child-911-calls-fatal-south-carolina-school-shooting/story?id=42757392

marked as duplicate by user178049, Laure, Glorfindel, shin, M.A.R. May 3 '17 at 17:08

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  • Yes they mean the same thing. We shouldn't bother saying "have got" because the "got" is redundant. English teachers try to stop us from doing it, but we do it anyway. – Tom B May 3 '17 at 12:12
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    @TomB - Or we could drop the have! "We got an active shooter.." Ha ha only serious; obviously, we sometimes actually do that. – stangdon May 3 '17 at 12:13
  • Yeah haha I was thinking about that. I think that is quite normal in American English, but you wouldn't catch me saying it. – Tom B May 3 '17 at 12:15
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Simply put, have got is actually the proper/grammatical way to say it. This is the type of grammar you will most likely see in books, news articles and formal speech. got with the dropped have is the same thing except that it's just a more colloquial way of saying it mostly heard only in daily English. For example, if you go to North America and listen to how people use this expression, you will see that most of them would just say I got instead of I've got or I have got. But that, of course, depends on who you're speaking with. And that's pretty much all that can be said about this.

Example:

How many children do you have?
I got one girl and two boys.

  • I'm not sure what you're suggesting – that "have got" is correct and "have" isn't? Or did you simply miss the point and attempted to answer a completely different question? – userr2684291 Jun 13 '17 at 16:11
  • In the present tense, have got and have are two forms for the same thing. have got, however, is spoken, have is either. Your example is not grammatical: I have one girl and two boys. or: I have got [I've got] one girl and two boys. got is most definitely not the way to be grammatical about it. Both are fine. – Lambie Nov 4 '18 at 22:46

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