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There are two kinds of artists left: those who endorse Pepsi and those who simply won't.

(Annie Lennox)

Specifically, what does "who simply won't" mean?

What's the humor of this quote?

can it be a play on words: "who simply won't" => "who simply wont"?

  • Can you explain what you're having trouble with? – user32753 May 3 '17 at 18:56
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    More context would help. Maybe Ms. Lennox means that companies offer lots of money to every artist. No artists have failed to receive offers big enough to sway them if they have no objection in principle. So all artists fall into two camps. Some of them take the money and endorse the product. And there are some "who simply won't" endorse products for money because of an objection in principle. – Chaim May 3 '17 at 19:08
  • can it be a play on words: "who simply won't" => "who simply wont"? – asianirish May 3 '17 at 19:18
  • No, I don't think it's a play on words. Wont is not a very common English word, it's pronounced rather differently than won't (wont: WAH-nt, won't: WOH-nt), and it doesn't make any sense there because it's a noun, not a verb. – stangdon May 3 '17 at 19:47
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This is an ellipsis, which would expand to:

There are two kinds of artists left: those who endorse Pepsi and those who simply won't endorse Pepsi.

  • what's the humor? (or wittiness) – asianirish May 3 '17 at 19:12
  • @asianirish - I think the point is that every artist either endorses Pepsi or absolutely refuses to; there is no artist who would endorse Pepsi but hasn't been asked to yet. – stangdon May 3 '17 at 19:49

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