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" I've died every day waiting for you " The word everyday considered as unfinished Time period ? I mean we could use it with present pefrect ?

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    You might have considered cried for your example, since logically it's not possible to die repeatedly. But as regards using present perfect - that's fine, provided that past state is directly relevant to "time of speaking" (even if it's only relevant because you're contrasting that past unhappiness with present joy). – FumbleFingers May 4 '17 at 16:58
  • [I mean could we use it with the pp?] – Lambie Apr 5 at 13:25
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You might have considered cried for your example, since logically it's not possible to die repeatedly. But as regards using present perfect - that's fine, provided that past state is directly relevant to "time of speaking" (even if it's only relevant because you're contrasting that past unhappiness with present joy).

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  • I've gone there every week and still have not met him. [the week is not over]

  • I've died every day waiting for you. [the day is not over]

Spoken in a present time, the time periods week and day have still not ended when the sentences are uttered.

Compare the present perfect to the present, used to express a generality:

I go there every week and still have not met him.

I die every day waiting for you.

To emphasize the repeated nature of the situation in the past and present, the present perfect is used.

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