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Is it correct to say : that thing doesn't suit to be here

Can suit be used like that? what are the rules for that verb.

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I don't think so. The verb suit is typically used like this:

This thing just doesn't suit me. So, I'm gonna have to go with something different.

Regarding your specific case, I'd say it like this:

That thing just doesn't belong here.

or:

That thing seems to be out of place.

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  • Thanks for the answer, what is the rule of that? Why can't suit be used in the sentence that I brought above. May 5 '17 at 7:30
  • I don't know anything about any rules. I just go by how I've heard this verb used. May 5 '17 at 7:34
  • I looked it up in a dictionary. And it looks like "suit" always takes an object. So, you can't say "suit to..." May 5 '17 at 7:36
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"Suit to" can only be used in a phrase structured as suit something to somebody/suit something to something which means to make something appropriate for something/somebody

  • He can suit his conversation to whoever he's with.

In your case it doesn't work. But it could if you changed it to:

  • That thing isn't suitable to be here.

The sentence That thing doesn't suit to be here can be rephrased to (depending on the context):

  1. That thing doesn't belong here
  2. That thing doesn't need to be here
  3. That thing doesn't fit (in) here
  4. That thing doesn't come in handy in here
  5. That thing doesn't have a (rightful) place here
  6. That thing doesn't go here
  7. That thing doesn't blend in here
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  • Isn't to be the object? Like I hate to be here, the object of hate is being here/to be here, I love helping him, the object is Helping Him, not Him alone as the object, they are all transitive verbs that need a direct object. I thought suit had the same basic rule May 5 '17 at 8:58
  • @ChaesarIbrani No, "to be here" is not an object. "Hate" is a catenative verb and "to be here" is its catenative complement. "Love" is also a catenative verb and "helping him" is catenative complement, not object.
    – BillJ
    May 5 '17 at 9:20
  • @BillJ Notwithstanding anything I have said in my answer, I would say, at a push, "suit" could be regarded as catenative. It doesn't suit to be difficult seems idiomatic to me. Perhaps it could be argued that there is an implied and unspoken direct object in "the boss", before "to be difficult".
    – WS2
    May 5 '17 at 11:25
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The verb suit has a wide number meanings and uses. But what we are discussing here are the two OED senses 14 - transitive (Do you think the hat suits you?) and 16 - intransitive (Would Beaujolais wine suit as an accompaniment to the beef bourguignon.)

  1. a. To be fitted or adapted to, be suitable for, answer the requirements of.

e.g. 1875 B. Jowett in tr. Plato Dialogues (ed. 2) III. 591 His own explanation did not suit all phenomena.

1891 Speaker 11 July 37/1 The error of supposing that what suits a small country could be readily transplanted to large European States.

And the intransitive:

  1. To be suitable, fitting, or convenient; to match or be in accord.

1865 J. W. Carlyle Lett. III. 269 Say Saturday; if that does not suit there will be time to tell me.

1971 ‘D. Halliday’ Dolly & Doctor Bird xiii. 193 I've done an Eysenck personality inventory on you both... You wouldn't suit.

In the case of the intransitive use, there is usually a hidden compliment, even if it is not stated. e.g. Does Saturday suit? In this case it is just that the object of the verb is not clearly stated, but it could be him, them, you, the condition of the pitch etc. - or a multiplicity of implied people and conditions.

In answer to your specific question, Does that thing suit to be here? - whilst the question itself is not idiomatic there is nothing especially wrong with the way suit is used. Normally in such as case one would say Is that thing suitable here?. But you could say Does it suit, right here?.

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  • Isn't to be the object? Like I hate to be here, the object of hate is being here/to be here, I love helping him, the object is Helping Him, not Him alone as the object, they are all transitive verbs that need a direct object. I thought suit had the same basic rule May 5 '17 at 8:59

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