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I have situation wherein out of the two sports team I'm in a dilemma which players will be a part of their respective teams. The players may or may not be a part of their respective teams due to various reasons.

Is this correct gramatically "It's really difficult to judge which players will be a part of squad today (talking of both the sides).

Is there a better way of saying so?

P.S. The sport is cricket.

  • In AmE you could say, if you were the coach, "It's hard to decide who to start today" or "who to play today". A coach can "start" a player, that is, put him or her in the game when it begins. Those players are the "starters". Or a coach can "play" a player", that is, put him or her into the game at some point, either as a substitute for a player who is taken out of the game, or as a starter. Sometimes in context "to play" a player means to start a player. – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 7 '17 at 10:55
  • If players could be chosen by either team or not chosen at all (not your case), you would say "It's difficult to judge which players will be part of which squad today." – Neil May 18 '18 at 10:39
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Your original sentence is reasonable, though should contain "each":

"It's really difficult to judge which players will be a part of each squad today"

A cricket "squad" is probably going to be all the players who could be chosen from to play an individual game (example), so you might use team, line-up or first eleven. You could use "selection", but that might give the impression of referring to Selectors choosing an international squad (example).

Perhaps use chosen since that's what Captains and Coaches do (they choose from the squad):

"It's really difficult to judge which players will be chosen today by each team"

Though I this is not much better than the sentence you started with - perhaps stick with writing the way you are happy to write.

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