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  1. Monthly Sales Report at April 2017

  2. Monthly Sales Report on April 2017

  3. Monthly Sales Report for April 2017

Which is suitable? I want to use it in a sentence like "Please refer to the attached 2 document for Monthly Sales at April 2017."

  • Hi Bee Bee. Please take a look at the help center to learn about how this site works and what is on topic. We can help with specific questions about English and learning English. For example, we could help if you are confused about the difference between attached and attachment. If you edit your question to make it about what is specifically concerning you about these sentences, we might be able to reopen it. – ColleenV May 8 '17 at 3:33
  • sorry about that. act is it i need to ask, (1) Monthly Sales Report [at] April 2017 or (2) Monthly Sales Report [on] April 2017 or (3) Monthly Sales Report [for] April 2017. which is suitable? – Bee Bee May 8 '17 at 3:42
  • I went ahead and edited your question based on your comment, but you can do it yourself next time - just click the edit link. Feel free to add more detail if I didn't write your question the way you would like it. – ColleenV May 8 '17 at 11:52
2

All of the below are equivalent:

(1) Please refer to the attached 2 documents for the monthly sales for April 2017

(2) Please refer to the attached 2 documents for monthly sales in April 2017

(3) Please refer to the attached 2 documents for the April 2017 Monthly Sales

I would like to point out the following:

  • It should be "documents" and not "document"
  • You would only capitalize "Monthly Sales" if they are in the title of the particular section in the attached documents. Otherwise, it would be "monthly sales". So, if you meant it as a title, (1) and (2) would have "Monthly Sales" instead of "monthly sales". However, (3) seems like it can only be a title, which is why it is capitalized.
  • Since April is a whole month, it is more correct to use "for" and "in" to account for sales that happen at any time or multiple times during the month. If it was a specific day, then you could say "on April 21st", for example.
  • I would only use at if it is followed by a specific location or a precise time, such as "Should I meet you at the restaurant?" or "Are we meeting at 1 o'clock?".

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