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I could not among the misty clouds /

Your unstable and painful image catch, /

‘Oh, my God’, I promptly said aloud, /

Having not a thought these words to fetch. /

How to make sense of this, mostly: Your unstable and painful image catch, when, maybe, coming after, I could not among the misty clouds /?

And, how to make sense of this, maybe, (phrase[?]), Having not a thought these words to fetch. /?

What may you, maybe, cite this, like, as, in English Grammar?

  • 2
    It's a standard poetic inversion of word order (anastrophe). For the sense of it, read it as "Among the misty clouds, I could not catch your unstable and painful image. 'Oh, my God,' I promptly said aloud, having not a thought to fetch these words." – Robusto May 10 '17 at 19:44
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    Why, do, you, use, so, many, commas? Seriously, although comma usage is largely a matter of style, you use a lot of commas which don't belong there. – stangdon May 10 '17 at 20:17
  • The (unnatural) inversion of word-order is driven by the rhyme-scheme. – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 10 '17 at 22:29
  • I think: someone, maybe, like, called it, maybe: “ . . . displacement . . .”. May that work? May you write it, like this? I could (noun phrase[?]) not (adverb[?]), among the misty clouds (prepositional phrase[?]), your unstable and painful image (subject compliment, phrase[?]), catch. If it, may, work, may you get to use something like, “That aircraft may, on sea, settle.”, and, or, “He liked, on any day, salt water sea food catching”. – saySay May 11 '17 at 20:43
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If you used standard word-order, it would be, "I could not catch your unstable and painful image among the misty clouds."

Prepositional phrases are allowed to float around like that. Moving the verb to the final position, though, is only seen in poetry (and badly translated German).

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