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I introduce two objects and need to tell how we refer each of the objects further in the text. How is it better to formulate it? Is the following correct:

There are two person in the study. We refer to one person who works a lot as "hard-working" and another as "lazy".

Sorry for such a profound example. :)

Update: I modified the example such that the terms characterising each person is not self-explanatory.

There are two persons in the study. We refer to one person who works a lot as P1, and another as P2.

The questions are:

1) Is it grammatically correct?

2) Is it concise and clear? If not, what should be the structure of the sentense?

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  • Replace your double hyphens with as. – StoneyB Apr 29 '17 at 18:45
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    Are you asking how to introduce terminology? – Drew Apr 29 '17 at 20:52
  • Yes, I need to introduce two mutually excluding types of objects. – desa Apr 29 '17 at 21:24
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There are several different ways you could convey this information. The first sentence needs to be corrected

to

There are two persons in the study.

or

There are two people in the study.

The second sentence could be changed to:

We will refer to the person who works a lot as the 'hard-working' person, and the other person as the 'lazy' person.

or

The study focused on two people: a 'hard-working' person and a 'lazy' person.

or

The two people in the study will be referred to as the 'hard-working' and 'lazy' persons, respectively.

or

There are two persons in the study, the 'hard-working' person, and the 'lazy' person.

Hope this helps.

  • Thank you a lot for your answer! Among your suggestions the variant that works the best is: "We will refer to the person who works a lot as the 'hard-working' person, and the other person as the 'lazy' person." Because in my case the categories are not self-explanatory as "hard-working" or "lazy". However, in what you suggested the word "person" is used many times. Is it possible to make it more concise? – desa Apr 29 '17 at 19:09
  • You're welcome. Yes, you could make it more concise: "The two people in the study are labeled 'hard-working' and 'lazy'" is one example. – Daniel M Apr 29 '17 at 20:18

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