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Does it mean "Open an Excel sheet and work with it"?

"By 2008, Deane, who was at various times an accountant, stay-at-home mom and university employee, had a simple plan to launch a business; it started with tea in the kitchen. "I thought, obviously, what you do is you go home, and if you are British, you have a cup of tea, and you put the computer on in the kitchen and you get excel up," she says."

Source: http://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/13/this-mom-built-a-65-million-business-the-cambridge-satchel-company.html

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    The only contexts in English, where the words "get excel up" occur, involve the software program; excel is otherwise a verb, and it would be ungrammatical to say "get {bare infinitive} up". You could have reasoned this out by consulting a dictionary and looking at whether the word excel can be a noun. May 15, 2017 at 11:05
  • If they mean "the computer program Excel" they should have capitalized it, because it's a proper name. But it might just be an editorial error, since excel is also a verb.
    – stangdon
    May 15, 2017 at 11:15
  • I did use this link oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/excel?q=excel, and this one: oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/…, but I didn't see any good explanation for the meaning of "get {bare infinitive} up".
    – haile
    May 15, 2017 at 11:20
  • There is no grammatical construction which follows the pattern get {bare infinitive} up, @haile. The pattern is "get {something} up" and the only "something" called "excel" is a software program called "Excel". May 15, 2017 at 19:45

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Get up is a phrasal verb meaning "to awaken." It can take an object like get X up meaning to awaken X from sleep.

This can be figuratively used to mean "to start" or "to prepare for use."

It usually implies that doing this is a process and takes some time.

We can infer two things from this figurative use of get up:

  • that Deane's computer may be old and slow and takes a while to start Excel,

  • that Deane likely keeps Excel open all day.

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