0

These 2 sentences are in my course book but I doubt its accuracy and I have to choose one of them. It's under zero/first conditional category.

which one is correct and why

1) Don't worry. Rob will have passed the exam if he studied enough.

2) Don't worry. Rob has passed the exam if he studied enough.

please tell me if both are correct with differences in meaning or

If none of them are correct, give me the right form.

  • 2
    Both are grammatical. – green_ideas May 15 '17 at 13:27
  • I think the correct form is : Rob would have passed the exam if he studied enough. – Chiller May 15 '17 at 13:33
  • The first one is correct but only in a very specific situation where the speaker was speaking about this hypothetically, knowing that Rob had been taking the exam but not yet knowing its results nor how much Rob had studied. I would imagine two girlfriends, one comforting the other. I just mean that I think this example is a little bit forced. – Teacher KSHuang May 16 '17 at 9:43
  • I'm having difficulty thinking of a context for the second one. Not sure why it's getting upvotes for grammaticality, but probably just a lapse on my part :O :). @Clare, could you please help provide a possible context for the second one wherein it would be grammatical? – Teacher KSHuang May 16 '17 at 9:45
  • @TeacherKSHuang why does it use '' future perfect not future simple? Is there any difference? – Masih K May 16 '17 at 13:30
1

Your first sentence is correct

Don't worry. Rob will have passed the exam if he studied enough.

You would say this after the test, will have passed is the hypothetical scenario given the condition "if he studied enough*"

You could also say after studying

Don't worry. Rob will pass the exam if he studied enough.

Or while he is still studying

Don't worry. Rob will pass the exam if he studies enough.

Your second sentence is almost correct

Don't worry. Rob has passed the exam if he studied enough.

better might be

Don't worry. Rob passed the exam since he studied enough.

which is a statement of fact and might be a follow up to your first sentence.

  • Thanks. I'm looking for a clearer answer considering perfect tenses . what are they trying to say using ''future perfect''? or the second one why ''present perfect'' – Masih K May 16 '17 at 13:32
  • The conditional is real past: Rob has done the test, and he has got his result, but the 1st and 2nd persons in the example don't know the result. In such a case (a single event in the past that is not certain from the speakers point of view), is example 2 of the OP grammatical and correct or not? – BazAU Jan 9 '18 at 13:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.