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What is the difference between " I am going in the bus " and "I am going by the bus". And which one is correct?

3 Answers 3

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The phrase in the bus refers to a particular bus or to a bus the speaker and listener both know, and by bus refers generically to the mode of transportation.

Are you driving to Saturday's football game?
--No, I'm going in the bus.

That snippet of conversation might be heard at a high school in the US, where it is common for students to take a school bus to games held at another rival school. There, the bus would refer to the bus normally dedicated to that purpose.

How do you get to work in the morning? Do you drive?
--No, I travel by bus from my home to the terminal, and from there I take the el into the city.

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  • No, I'm going on the bus; most definitely not "in the bus".
    – Lambie
    Commented Jul 22, 2023 at 15:00
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I am going in the bus

This can mean

  • A) at this moment, you are stepping on and going inside a bus, presumably one that is about to leave, or

  • B) there are several options for travel available to you and you are going select the option to travel by bus.

I am going by the bus

This can mean:

  • A) you are walking by (as in near) a bus.

  • B) there are several options for travel available to you and you are going select the option to travel by bus.

  • C) you are going somewhere and using a bus to do it, though I am going by bus is more idiomatic. (Don't try to say I am going in bus - that does not work).

You probably want to say I am going by bus.

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Method of transportation:

I am going by bus or I am going on the bus.

in the bus is not used here unless you mean: I'm going on top of the bus.

She's sitting in the bus, not in the car. [OK]

I got on the bus at 2 o'clock.

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  • Please disregard downvoters here.
    – Lambie
    Commented Sep 15, 2023 at 13:29

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