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I want to say that someone put her baby to sleep and was reading her book while she was sitting in the sitting room.

The Continuous can't be followed by the Gerund. So, I can't say:

His wife, who had just put her baby to sleep, was sitting in the sitting room, reading a book.

Is it acceptable to say:

His wife, who had just put her baby to sleep, was sitting in the sitting room and reading a book.

Are there other possible variants?

  • reading book => reading a book in both sentences – Stephen S May 20 '17 at 12:05
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    I don't know who told you Continuous can't be followed by the Gerund, but even if that might apply in some contexts (I've no idea what it even means), it doesn't apply to your example. Take, for example, Otis was sitting on the dock of the bay, watching the tide roll away. I won't hear a word against that, on musical or grammatical grounds. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica May 20 '17 at 16:02
  • @FumbleFingers, I meant, I couldn't say "His wife, who had just put her baby to sleep, was sitting reading a book in the sitting room." inspite of the variants above, could I? So, we use gerund as a "turnover of the participle". – Anthony Voronkov May 27 '17 at 11:26
  • I still don't understand what you're asking about. There's nothing wrong with the example in your above comment - except I'd probably say His wife, who had just put her baby to sleep, was sitting reading a book in the lounge, simply because the repetition of sitting comes across as "clumsy". But that's really got nothing to do with gerunds (not that I know or care whether the compound noun sitting room involves a gerund usage anyway). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica May 27 '17 at 12:15

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