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I'd like to say things in this way, is it proper? For example

He went to see her which I don't know if was the the right thing to do..

Is it right? If false what makes it so? How can I express the same thing the most conscience way?

Thank you..

  • Your question is kind of unclear. Can you add a little context and explain what specific aspect you're questioning? – fixer1234 May 21 '17 at 5:42
  • I think which is out of place. I am not sure what you are trying to say, but maybe "He went to see her. I don't know if it was the the right thing to do.. " or "He went to see her though I don't know if it was the the right thing to do.. " – user3169 May 21 '17 at 5:42
  • the question here is how can I use "which, if and it" all n harmony to make things grammatically correct.. – Ceyhun Özsoylu Jul 10 '17 at 12:12
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The phrase could make sense, but it is lacking punctuation, and has a few grammatical errors.

It would be, "He went to see her, but I don't know if it was the right thing to do."

Hope that helps.

  • is there any way to say it the way I constructed? because I dont know why we have to use "but" instead of which, but adds some negativity (kind of) hence I want to make it more neutral sounding by using "which" he went to see her whether which was the right thing to do I don't know. OR like in original, he went to see her which I don't know if was the right thing to do.. – Ceyhun Özsoylu Jul 10 '17 at 12:11
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Trying to stay close to the syntax of your original statement:

He went to see her, which I am not sure was the right thing to do.

He went to see her, which was the right thing to do.

He went to see her, which was the wrong thing to do.

He went to see her, which I am uncertain was the right thing to do.

The phrase "I don't know if..." must be followed by a clause with a subject:

... I don't know if it was the right thing to do.

However, you have chosen to use the relative which, and a which-clause must not use the pronoun it to refer back to the subject in the main clause:

He went to see her, which I don't know if it was the right thing to do. ungrammatical

If you want to use it, you must abandon the which-clause and use a conjunction instead:

He went to see her but I don't know if it was the right thing to do.

P.S. The blah-blah, which I am not sure if I like it ungrammatical

The antecedent of which is the nominal "blah-blah".

I am not sure wants as its complement an independent clause:

I am not sure I like it.

I am not sure if I like it marginal / ungrammatical

I don't know if|whether I like it.

  • I like your progressive reasoning, is there any way to say it the way I constructed? because I dont know why we have to use "but" instead of which, but adds some negativity (kind of) hence I want to make it more neutral sounding by using "which" he went to see her whether which was the right thing to do I don't know. OR like in original, he went to see her which I don't know if was the right thing to do.. – Ceyhun Özsoylu Jul 10 '17 at 12:11
  • You want to express the idea that you have reservations about his action. You can either use a conjunction that expresses the idea [but, though, although, yet, however] or you can use a modal. Conjunction: He went to see her, though I'm not sure it was the right thing to do. Modal: He went to see her, which may not have been the right thing to do. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 10 '17 at 12:38
  • You can also say He went to see her, which, I'm uncertain, was the right thing to do. [that is, without repeating it in the relative clause, which is disallowed, as which is the subject of was. I've added commas around "I'm uncertain" to try to indicate its syntactic role in the clause. It is a predication about the predication in the relative clause in which it is embedded as an aside.] – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 10 '17 at 12:59
  • I think the tough example misses "if/whether" right? He went to see her, tough I'm not sure if/whether it was the right thing to do..?? secondly, my answer in question is then correct if I omit "if"? you gave same example without if and using "I'm uncertain" instead of "I don't know" right? also thirdly and finally, the point of this question is why can I not use "if" to say bla bla.. which I'm not sure if I like it.. why do we have to omit the "if" here? thank you – Ceyhun Özsoylu Sep 9 '17 at 0:24
  • You can say, "...which I'm not sure I like", using relative which as the object of like. In a which-clause, you cannot use a pronoun to refer back to the antecedent of which in the matrix clause. The book, which I gave it to you, had a red cover. [ungrammatical]. The book, which I'm not sure if I like it, had a red cover. [ungrammatical]. Removing it for that reason, we're left with "which I'm not sure if I like" which lacks an object for like in the if-clause complement of sure, and is ungrammatical for that reason. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 9 '17 at 9:38

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