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I usually use the 2nd sentence. I want to know when to use the first one.

  1. The children badgered their father into taking them to a movie
  2. The children badgered their father to take them to a movie

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There's no overemphasis. They mean different things.

The children badgered their father to take them to a movie.

In this case the result of the badgering is uncertain he may yet take them - or may not. The children are still asking and trying to convince him to take them. You need to add a second statement to make it clear what happened:

The children badgered their father to take them to a movie but he told them they couldn't go.
The children badgered their father to take them to a movie. He refused at first but they kept bugging him until he agreed.

In the other form, with "into", the decision has been made... he has agreed. There's no ambiguity. Using "into" shows that the change has already occurred.

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