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Larry Talbot says this words to her brother's wife:

I seem to recall he mentioned you in one of his letters. And it's quite uncharacteristic of my brother to treat a lady in such a way, but the character of man is such a shiftable thing.

If Larry is taking about woman why does he mentions about man in this sentence: character of man is such a shiftable thing?

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    He's actually talking about the character of his brother (who has behaved uncharacteristically towards some particular lady), so the "gender mismatch" you're worried about doesn't exist here anyway. But in other contexts, the character of man could be seen a "genderless" term referring to the character of human beings in general (not just the males). English is less concerned with such gender distinctions than many other languages. – FumbleFingers May 24 '17 at 17:32
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The author is referring to the character of a man because

I seem to recall he mentioned you in one of his letters. And it's quite uncharacteristic of my brother to treat a lady in such a way, but the character of man is such a shiftable thing.

He is talking about his brother.

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