3

Is it correct sentence?

"I have been really into science fiction movies recently".

If it is right, what is difference with

"I am really into science fiction movies"?

2
  • I have really been into OR I am really into to. They have different meanings. The first means up until the moment I am speaking now. And the second means: as I speak now. I have really been into is much more fluent.
    – Lambie
    May 29, 2017 at 18:42
  • @Lambie - "Really have been into" is much more fluent? Really? Your rewrite changes the meaning; your "really" is an adverb that qualifies "have been" while the "really" in "really into" is an adjective that qualifies "into". May 29, 2017 at 21:40

3 Answers 3

9

It is correct. "I am really into science fiction movies" means that you like such movies and (probably) have always liked them. "I have been really into science fiction movies recently" implies that you have recently developed a greater interest in science fiction movies while (probably) you hadn't before.

4
  • It is not correct as written: I have been really into science fiction movies recently. It should be: I have really been into science fiction movies recently. You misquoted it, and then said it was correct.
    – Lambie
    May 29, 2017 at 18:40
  • 8
    @lambie: both versions sound fine to this native speaker.
    – TonyK
    May 29, 2017 at 19:48
  • @TonyK: They both sound OK to me, but I think the "have really been" version sounds better than the "been really into" version. I think this is because "into ____" is a prepositional phrase rather than an adjective, so modifying it with "really" sounds even more colloquial than using it on its own. (Of course, colloquial usage is not bad -- far from it. But language learners are usually better off practicing more neutral registers, because deploying the appropriate register is comparatively quite difficult.)
    – ruakh
    May 29, 2017 at 21:53
  • After the "been" emphasizes the really, while before the "been" does not (perhaps the "recently" takes the fore).
    – user32753
    May 29, 2017 at 22:28
0

"I have been really into science fiction movies recently".

If it is right, what is difference with
"I am really into science fiction movies"?

Incorrect. Especially the first one.

The only incorrect aspect is that the period should be inside the quotation marks.

Note that some popular usage of the word "really" is often treated as quite informal. In a formal English paper, it would be better to say that you are "very much info" science fiction, or even are "very interested in" or "very involved with" science fiction.

However, in common, everyday usage (how people actually speak), it's fine.

Unlike user3169's answer, I would say that the word "recently" indicates this is probably a new truth, indicating that you were probably not as heavily into Sci-Fi until recent times.

By the way, welcome to being a Sci-Fi admirer. (Just to make sure you know: there is also a SciFi.StackExchange.com site.)

1
  • Just a heads up that user3169 has deleted their answer - you may want to remove the reference to it in your answer.
    – ColleenV
    May 29, 2017 at 22:48
-3

S.B. "I have recently been really into science fiction movies."

Putting "recently" last is a misplaced modifier; it modifies "science fiction movies" instead of the time frame of your interest and adds ambiguity.

Another construction would be "Recently, I have been really into science fiction movies."

Most readers would understand the intent with the original sentence but sometimes intent is lost. Proper construction can sound stilted, though and in cases when ambiguity isn't a problem, writing more colloquially is probably fine.

Try this "I saw a dog running along the road." Compare with "Running along the road, I saw a dog." In the first sentence, the dog's running; in the second, you are.

BTW, punctuation always goes inside quotes. :)

2
  • 3
    This is nonsense.
    – TonyK
    May 29, 2017 at 22:09
  • The proper placement of punctuation with respect to quotes depends on where you're from. The two forms are sometimes called "American quotes" and "logical quotes", for good reason. But even in the American style, semicolons go outside the quotes, and they're certainly punctuation, so the claim "punctuation always goes inside quotes" is by no means correct.
    – wchargin
    May 29, 2017 at 23:17

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .