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I found this tweet but I don't know what it implies... Does it mean the show will regret that it spent more time wallowing in sad feelings about what it had done and should have spent more time speaking about what it would do to improve the journalistic integrity?

Have a feeling 60 Minutes is going to wish that apology had more time devoted to a commitment to act differently and less to sad feelings. — Linda Holmes (@nprmonkeysee) November 11, 2013

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    Yes. Some view apologies as implicit promises, some (myself included) prefer a specific, explicit declaration of a new course of action over an expression of regret. I'm not familiar with this particular issue, but it seems like Holmes would like someone at 60 Minutes to talk about what they're going to do differently rather than talk about how bad they all feel that something happened in the first place. – Tyler James Young Nov 11 '13 at 17:27
  • As you seem satisfied with my comment as an answer, I'm going to submit it (so that this question doesn't end up on the Unanswered list). – Tyler James Young Nov 12 '13 at 15:56
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Your interpretation is accurate.

Some view apologies as implicit promises, some prefer a specific, explicit declaration of a new course of action over an expression of regret.

It seems like Holmes would like someone at 60 Minutes to talk about what they're going to do differently rather than talk about how bad they all feel that something happened in the first place.

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There are ways, in an apology, to focus on feelings such that the apology is ineffective or even insincere.

For instance, suppose I call someone stupid, and that person feels bad. Someone else suggests that I apologize, and so I say: "I am deeply sorry that you feel bad because I called you stupid". Notice how this is not really an apology at all; it only begins with the words "I'm sorry", which are not being used to express regret for one's actions. It basically says, "It is regretful that you feel bad because someone (who happened to be me) correctly pointed out to you that you are stupid, but the only way it can be fixed is if you smarten up."

Then there is this: "I feel bad that I called you stupid". Notice that while this is now an apology, it also does not say "I do not think you are stupid, and should not have called you that". It expresses no commitment not to call that person stupid in the future (and feel bad again). It basically says, "You actually are stupid, but pointing that out to you made me feel bad. I wish someone else had said it instead of me, and if you keep demonstrating that you're stupid, the same comment might slip out of my mouth again in the future."

It looks like Linda Holmes is criticizing the show 60 Minutes for making, in her view, a less than effective apology of some sort, perhaps along one of these patterns.

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