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I've got a piece of text:

Mr Rigby pleaded guilty to dangerous driving and was fined £1,080 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £108 and costs of £85. In addition to (ban/being banned) for 12 months, he was ordered to take an extended driving test.

Is it correct to use "ban" instead of "being banned"?

2 Answers 2

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In addition to a ban of 12 months, he was ordered to take an extended driving test.

Use of above sentence should be correct.

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  • Even though your sentence may seem to be correct, the layout of the question hints to it being a multiple choice question from some kind of test. Therefore I think your solution is not a valid answer to the question. May 30, 2017 at 12:00
  • The choice is between "ban" and "being banned" - no other variants, no other modifications. It's an exam question.
    – Alex Wells
    May 30, 2017 at 12:01
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Oxford link The definition that fits this case:

Officially prevent (someone) from doing something.
‘her son was banned for life from the Centre’

Some examples:

  1. I ban you from my house.

This means that I prevent you from entering my house.

  1. I am being banned from my house.

This means that someone is preventing me from entering my house.


Mr Rigby pleaded guilty to dangerous driving and was fined £1,080 and ordered to pay a victim surcharge of £108 and costs of £85. In addition to (ban/being banned) for 12 months, he was ordered to take an extended driving test.

Mr Rigby is not the person who is enforcing the ban. He is the target of the ban. Therefore, it would only be correct to say that Mr Rigby is being banned.

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  • But can it be used as a noun, not a verb?
    – Alex Wells
    May 30, 2017 at 16:23
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    @AlexWells - If you did use the word ban as a noun, you would still have to structure the sentence differently. You would have to say something like "in addition to receiving a ban". You can't just say "in addition to ban"; that doesn't make any sense.
    – stangdon
    May 30, 2017 at 19:06

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