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I am searching for a way to say that the man who raped the girl, which now the man with no moral code protects (his daughter) is also his boss.

This is what I have so far:

“A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from her perpetrator and his boss, the man who…”

  • By saying "jobs", you mean, classificcation or something? I am thinking that the actual example might be under either "hypocrisy" or "metanoia". Either way, irony abounds. – shin Jun 2 '17 at 7:33
  • Who is being protected? The rapist or the victim? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 2 '17 at 11:14
  • Are you trying to say "A man whose daughter has been raped and who does nothing to bring the rapist to justice because the rapist is his boss, is a man with no moral code"? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 2 '17 at 11:21
  • Can you tell more about the context where you would say this sentence? For example, is it part of a synopsis of a movie? – Ben Kovitz Jun 2 '17 at 13:54
  • @Ben It is a logline for a script. The additional details: The man with no moral code is the father of the rape victim. He works for the man who raped his daughter – aka the boss. His boss is the man who promised to make America great again. So the logline would be “A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from her perpetrator and his boss, the man who...” What I want to know is if the connection – “from her perpetrator and his boss” is understood correctly, that this is the same person. If not, what would be a correct way to say this in the shortest possible way? – Syk Jun 4 '17 at 7:31
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First of all, "her perpetrator" is not correct. The criminal perpetrates the crime, not the victim. You could write "the perpetrator" or "her rapist".

To express that the perpetrator is also the boss, I would use an appositive:

A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from the perpetrator, his boss, the man who...

This requires a little bit of care since it may at first glance look like the man with no moral code is protecting her from three different men. It depends on how the rest of the sentence goes. You could also use a dash which clarifies and also adds a bit of emphasis:

A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from the perpetrator—his boss—a man who...

(Note that this is an em dash and not a hyphen. Compare — with -. Some writers would use a hyphen with spaces, or spaces around the em dash; consult your style guide.)

Or you could use a colon:

A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from the perpetrator, his boss: the man who...

You can also use an adjective clause.

A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from the perpetrator, who is his boss: the man who...

Using "the perpetrator" instead of "her rapist" adds some ambiguity in these examples; it leaves open the possibility that the victim is male and the perpetrator is the boss of the victim.

  • @ Nate Eldredge Tons of good advice, thanks. A question about using the em dash. I am from Europe, where we do not use it at all and was wondering would it be considered normal (or lazy) to have more than one em dash in a sentence. The logline would then be: “A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from the perpetrator — his boss — the predator who rules the White House and has no idea his latest victim is his loyal servant’s only daughter. – Syk Jul 13 '17 at 4:56
  • @Syk: Yes, that's exactly correct for an appositive: you put an em dash before and after. There's nothing wrong with it. – Nate Eldredge Jul 13 '17 at 21:30
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What about this:

A man with no moral code protects a rape victim from her perpetrator and his boss, both being the same person

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