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I am wondering if Tete-a-Tete has a similar meaning as mutual relation between two entities such as the following:

  • Suicide rate and depression are Tete-a-Tete.
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    We would say that they go hand-in-hand. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 2 '17 at 10:17
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"tête-à-tête" is taken from French, and it literally means "head-to-head", better translated to English: "face-to-face".

It is used for the discussion of two persons, when they concentrate their attention to each other (unlike having a casual conversation while each of the persons is concentrated on some other activity). Usually is a private conversation, but not necessarily secret. It can happen in a cafe, where people around may hear what is being discussed.

It is NOT recommended to use it for other purposes or with other similar meanings: side-by-side, together, related, competing, hand-in-hand...


I am wondering if Tete-a-Tete has a similar meaning as mutual relation between two entities such as the following:

  • Suicide rate and depression are Tete-a-Tete.

No, it does not have such meaning.

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tête-à-tête - an informal private conversation between two people, especially friends

But it can also mean "side by side" or "closely related".

  • So that my sentence in the question is meaningful? – lonesome Jun 2 '17 at 7:39
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    It's borrowed from French, meaning head-to-head. It sounds like the quote is about comparing rates of suicide and depression. Saying they are head-to-head would mean that the rates are very similar. It's the kind of thing you might say about two horses in a race if they were side-by-side on the track, performing the same. – fixer1234 Jun 2 '17 at 7:48
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    @lonesome No, I have only ever heard tête-à-tête used when talking about a private meeting between two people. It does not mean the same as "equivalent" or "of about the same value". – SteveES Jun 2 '17 at 8:40
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    @lonesome tête-à-tête is synonymous with the phrase one-on-one. – SteveES Jun 2 '17 at 8:48
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    But it can also mean "side by side" or "closely related". [citation needed] (–1) – userr2684291 Jun 2 '17 at 11:51

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