1

Neither I can go out nor she can come to me.

Is this sentence grammatically correct? Do I need to change "inversion"?

  • Yes, it is grammatical but people rarely speak like that. – Lambie Jun 2 '17 at 16:06
  • @Lambie What about "Neither can I go out nor can she come to me"? – Aung Thu Jun 2 '17 at 16:11
  • I have answered your question already. – Lambie Jun 2 '17 at 16:14
  • @AungThu Most people wouldn't use neither-nor in this case because the subject is different for each part. – SteveES Jun 2 '17 at 16:17
  • @AungThu I believe the inverted form used in your comment is better and is certainly close, if not exactly how I would say it myself. I am British, but have no idea what difference that makes. – WS2 Jun 2 '17 at 16:49
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Neither I can go out nor she can come to me.

does not sound quite right, your second offering

Neither can I go out nor can she come to me.

is better, meaning you are stuck where you are.

Neither can I go nor can she come.

is more concise, "to her" and "to me" is implied, using "out" confuses the issue.

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