1

A boy is wearing a T-shirt which is green colour.

To make it less clumsy, I rewrite it this way:

A boy is in green T-shirt

Do the two sentences have any difference in meaning now?

3

A boy is wearing a green T-shirt.

That's a picture of a boy in a green T-shirt.

A boy is wearing a T-shirt, which is green colour.

A boy is wearing a T-shirt, which is a greenish colour.

When stating the color by its name ("green"), we don't add the word "colour" afterwards. But when saying that the color is in a particular color range, that there is an admixture of another color or colors ("greenish"), then we do add the word "colour" afterwards. The word "greenish" could suggest an admixture of yellow, like a pea-green, or it could suggest an admixture of blue, like a teal.

The underlying fact is the same when we use is in and is wearing. They are synonymous expressions.

She is in a wool coat. She is wearing a wool coat.

  • People sometimes do say "green in color". I've never understood why. As opposed to what? "Green in height"? "Green in religion"? It makes sense in cases where a word can be a color and can also be something else, like "caramel". – Jay Jun 6 '17 at 15:25
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    English speakers have been saying tall in height and other similar things. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 6 '17 at 15:37
  • @tonamor Oh, absolutely true. It's not just color where people do this, it's many things. – Jay Jun 6 '17 at 15:39
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    @kitty: I can see your words. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 16 '17 at 11:06
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    @kitty: you are welcome. It is normal practice here to use the username, so that is not a problem at all. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 16 '17 at 12:57
1

Essentially the meaning is the same for both.
I would modify them a bit, though:

A boy is wearing a T-shirt which is green in colour.
A boy is wearing a T-shirt which is green coloured.
A boy is wearing a T-shirt which is green.

The third is the best since "green" in this context already means the color green so you don't need to add it specifically.

A boy is wearing a green T-shirt.

This fourth would be more common though.


As for the second sentence, I think it misses an indefinite article:

A boy is in a green T-shirt.

that seems a lot better, although without context to me it still sounds a bit off. It's not wrong, it is correct both syntactically and semantically.

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