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I heard the term "jointy cigarette" in an video about Sir Arthur Schuster: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efOzHkl6GJ8&feature=youtu.be&t=34s

But what does this mean? The web search only shows the connection to cannabis. Is this term describing that it is a hand rolled cigarette? Or does it relate to the inclusion of a filter or something else?

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The word on the video is "jaunty".

The relevant definition from the Oxford English Dictionary is:

Easy and sprightly in manner; having or affecting well-bred or easy sprightliness; affecting airy self-satisfaction or unconcern.

The use of "jaunty" is an example of the common figure of speech called hypallage: "jaunty" really describes the person, but is applied to the cigarette, as that is what exemplifies his jauntiness.

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    @MarvinEmilBrach -- "Jaunty" describes the attitude or manner of the relevant person. In this context, the cigarette is held or used in a way that is consistent with other people getting this impression about the cigarette's smoker. – Jasper Jun 14 '17 at 0:21
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    Can't place the regional accent here, @ColinFine. Studs become stoods and jaunty becomes j/oh/nty. Do you recognize it? – P. E. Dant Jun 14 '17 at 0:53
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    @MarvinEmilBrach You are well advised to believe it when folks who have been listening to English all their lives tell you what is spoken by an English speaker. In this case, the word is certainly jaunty just as Mr Fine says. I think the OED entry is as authoritative a detail as you are liable to find. If this disappoints you, of course, you may continue to imagine that he says "jointy," and no-one will be any worse off. – P. E. Dant Jun 14 '17 at 1:02
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    @MarvinEmilBrach: it is certainly "jaunty", whatever the subtitles may say. It sounds to me like an antipodean accent - Australian or NZ. The use of "jaunty" is an example of the common figure of speech called hypallage: "jaunty" really describes the person, but is applied to the cigarette, as that is what exemplifies his jauntiness. – Colin Fine Jun 14 '17 at 11:12
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    @ColinFine The man saying jaunty has an English accent (not sure of the region), but the presenter has and AUS/NZ accent. – user42526 Jun 14 '17 at 12:47

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