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I want to write this sentence in shorter form

I want to see the differences between the decisions made in scenario A, the decisions made in scenario B, the decisions made in scenario C, the decisions made in scenario D.

How should I write that without losing any meaning?

Thank you

  • I want to see the difference between (the decisions made in) the A, B, C, and D scenarios? – Cardinal Jun 14 '17 at 18:38
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    "I want to see the differences between the decisions made in scenarios A, B, C, and D." This preserves the meaning and will be easily understood by any reader. – P. E. Dant Jun 14 '17 at 18:47
  • @P.E.Dant (+1) is it wrong to put the "scenarios" at the end of the sentence? – Cardinal Jun 14 '17 at 18:52
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    @Cardinal - It's not wrong, but I say it's "clunkier." Just my opinion, though. – J.R. Jun 14 '17 at 19:10
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    @Cardinal What J.R. said. Most native speakers would write it as in my comment. – P. E. Dant Jun 14 '17 at 22:07
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Not to take away from other suggestions here, but one option would be:

I want to see the differences between the decisions made in each of the scenarios: A, B, C, and D.

If the list of letters seems too terse, you could list them as "scenario A, scenario B, scenario C and scenario D," but I find that a bit wordy.

As a side point, you might consider using "among" instead of "between", since there are more than two scenarios. Else, you could use a different locution to remove that problem entirely:

I want to contrast the decisions made in scenarios A through D.

  • These would all work, but I'm not sure why you didn't also suggest: I want to see the differences in the decisions for scenarios A, B, C, and D, which was my initial thought. – J.R. Jun 14 '17 at 18:51
  • Why didn't I also suggest that? Well.... it didn't occur to me. Good one. Also bypasses the "between"/"among" issue, which is awkward because "among" is more correct but kind of sounds worse. – G Tony Jacobs Jun 14 '17 at 18:53
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I want to see the differences between the decisions made in the following scenarios:

  • scenario A
  • scenario B
  • scenario C
  • scenario D

In that case all scenarios look the same

Another way

I want to see the distinction between the decisions made with the different scenarios A, B, C, and D.

  • I think the OP wants to reword that sentence to a more compact one! Not knowing the difference between those very scenarios! – Cardinal Jun 14 '17 at 18:45
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You could also ask:

How do the decisions made in scenarios A, B, C, and D differ?

or "differ from one another".

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