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I am not sure if the sentence forms following "i.e." are correct. Can the native speakers here please help?

  1. Is John bilingual, i.e., does he speak two languages?

1'. Is John bilingual, i.e. he speaks two languages?

  1. Is John bilingual, i.e., he speaks two languages, or trilingual, i.e., he speaks three languages?

2'. Is John bilingual, i.e., does he speak two languages, or trilingual, i.e., does he speak three languages?

Are they all acceptable?

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1'. Is John bilingual, i.e. he speaks two languages?

and

  1. Is John bilingual, i.e., he speaks two languages, or trilingual, i.e., he speaks three languages?

Would not be acceptable as i.e. generally means something similar to that is meaning you're essentially asking the question again, whilst giving an example.

For example - "Are you European, i.e. do you live in Europe?" would be correct, whereas "Are you European i.e. live in Europe?" would not be. "Live in Europe?" is not a properly formed question.

As you're asking the question again you would need to include the "does he" part for this to be a proper question.

  1. Is John bilingual, i.e., does he speak two languages?

and

2'. Is John bilingual, i.e., does he speak two languages, or trilingual, i.e., does he speak three languages?

Would be acceptable if you were to remove the commas after i.e.

  • See Fowler on the comma after i.e. I think it's reasonable here. – Ben Kovitz Jun 15 '17 at 17:22
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I've always mentally substituted "in other words" when I use i.e., and I find that that tends to make my sentence construction sensible. Whatever works with "in other words" seems to work well with "i.e.", in my experience.

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