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He is a fast bowler of repute, but his yesterday's performance wasn't up to the mark.

Which is the correct option to replace the bold part in above sentence ?

A) performance of yesterday

B) performance for yesterday

I know yesterday's performance is too correct in spoken English but I am asking in context of formal English which option from A and B is correct to use here ?

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You should use:

He is a fast bowler of repute, but his performance yesterday wasn't up to the mark.

No preposition is used with yesterday.

Also, using repute is dated at best. I would use:

He has a reputation as a fast bowler, but his performance yesterday wasn't up to the mark.

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There are a couple of different ways that will work.

The most standard way, is to use yesterday separately - marking what time frame you're talking about his bad performance in:

He is a fast bowler, but yesterday, his performance wasn't up to the mark.

He is a fast bowler, but his performance wasn't up to the mark yesterday.

He is a fast bowler, but his performance, yesterday, wasn't up to the mark.

Note that the the third example may seem similar to what you have written - but it's important to note that "performance yesterday" doesn't work well by itself. It is a sentence talking about his performance, with the qualifying time frame in parenthesis.


Alternatively, you can talk about yesterday's performance. This is more commonly used when talking about an event, such as a match, that has just happened.

He is [normally] a fast bowler, but yesterday's performance wasn't up the mark.

This kind of phrasing is most commonly used when talking about a sporting event that has just happened - and when trying to bring conversation onto the subject of the previous day's match. It moves the focus away from him normally being a fast bowler, and onto the fact that yesterday he wasn't.

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