0

I will go to the beach next Saturday, so I want to know the weather at the beach next Saturday.

I am trying to describe this without referring to the specific time "next Saturday". My examples are as follows.

  1. I want to know the weather at the beach when I go there.
  2. I want to know how the weather will be at the beach when I go there.

I think the second one is grammatically correct, but I am not sure whether the first one is correct. Specifically, I think the first one needs a verb such as "expected" before "when" because "when" cannot modify the noun "weather".

  • I'm sure you'd rather know the weather "at the beach" than "in the beach" unless you are planning on having your friends bury you in the sand. – Peter Jun 20 '17 at 3:51
  • I revised it in line with your advice. – rama9 Jun 20 '17 at 4:04
0

Your first sentence is closest to being idiomatic

I want to know the weather at the beach when I go.

"there" is implied and would be redundant.

It can also be expressed as

I want to know the weather when I go to the beach.
I want to know what the weather will be when I go to the beach.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.