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I will go to the beach next Saturday, so I want to know the weather at the beach next Saturday.

I am trying to describe this without referring to the specific time "next Saturday". My examples are as follows.

  1. I want to know the weather at the beach when I go there.
  2. I want to know how the weather will be at the beach when I go there.

I think the second one is grammatically correct, but I am not sure whether the first one is correct. Specifically, I think the first one needs a verb such as "expected" before "when" because "when" cannot modify the noun "weather".

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    I'm sure you'd rather know the weather "at the beach" than "in the beach" unless you are planning on having your friends bury you in the sand.
    – Peter
    Jun 20, 2017 at 3:51
  • I revised it in line with your advice.
    – rama9
    Jun 20, 2017 at 4:04
  • I need to know what the weather will be like on Saturday.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Jun 28, 2021 at 7:19

1 Answer 1

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Your first sentence is closest to being idiomatic

I want to know the weather at the beach when I go.

"there" is implied and would be redundant.

It can also be expressed as

I want to know the weather when I go to the beach.
I want to know what the weather will be when I go to the beach.

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