2

To my knowledge, 'late' can be placed in front of time period terms (day/week/month/year) to indicate the final part of a duration. However, there are a number of constructions (especially ones involving the present time period as opposed to past or future) that are open to my personal doubt, mostly due to the lack of search results for instances of their usage. Are the 'late-phrases' in the list below correct and natural English? If not, how can I reword them to express the same idea?

  1. There will be a movie in here late tomorrow.

  2. I will be starting university late this year.

  3. We will expect a sudden temperature drop late this month.

  4. He will arrive late today

Many thanks in advance.

  • @DavidWashington 1. We would never say "There will be a movie in here tomorrow evening." The in is not idiomatic. 2. We would never say " I will be starting Uni after fall this year." You might hear after the fall. 3. In AmE, we don't use uni as an abbreviation for university. – P. E. Dant Jun 21 '17 at 18:43
  • @P.E.Dant, #1 my mistake, I was lazy. I simply copied the op's sentence and changed the time adv. For #2, what about these two: "Steel demand set for 2010 rebound after fall this year", "Apple iPad mini 2 will probably hit the shelves after fall this year" ? #3, the uni. appears on unbandictionary, "I'm got classes at uni this afternoon", some people liked it some people didn't, but as long as we understand what the OP wanted to say, I think it is acceptable (in this question only). – David Washington Jun 21 '17 at 19:28
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    @DavidWashington "Steel demand set for 2010 rebound after fall this year" et al. are headlinese, and do not reflect actual usage. Try a search on this site for the term. Uni is a BrE idiom, almost never heard elsewhere. – P. E. Dant Jun 21 '17 at 19:31
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    "There will be a movie shown late tomorrow here in the auditorium." – P. E. Dant Jun 22 '17 at 9:25
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    @David Washington, no problem mate. If you didn't bring it up I wouldn't have learned something new. – JUNCINATOR Jun 22 '17 at 11:39
1

There will be a movie in here late tomorrow.

better might be

There will be a movie shown late tomorrow.
There will be a movie shown tomorrow evening.

Interesting ambiguity in your second sentence

I will be starting Uni late this year.
Uni will have already started by the time I get there.

I will be starting Uni later this year.
I will be starting Uni in the fall.

We will expect a sudden temperature drop late this month.
We will expect a sudden temperature drop at towards end of the month.

Your last sentence is interesting in the same way the second sentence is

He will arrive late today.
He is coming today, but will be late (whenever he arrives).

He will arrive later today.
He will arrive in the evening today.

  • Thanks for the answer. However, does this means none of my example sentences are correct though? You did provide alternatives but did not leave an assessment of whether the existing late-phrases in each of my sentence is idiomatic. – JUNCINATOR Jun 27 '17 at 11:30

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