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SOURCE

What does this phrase mean:

"We're falling far tonight"

..especially "falling far"? I really can't find anywhere what that means.

closed as off-topic by P. E. Dant, Ben Kovitz, user3169, James K, Peter Jun 23 '17 at 3:28

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  • 1
    Could you please add some more context to your question? – Ken Graham Jun 22 '17 at 4:11
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    "When it gets darker we're falling far tonight" ,this is pretty much all – Andrei Ionut Jun 22 '17 at 4:46
  • Please use the edit link to tell us what you did not understand about your English dictionary's definition of the verb to fall and the adverb far. What English dictionary did you consult? This is a song lyric, but you should at least begin with understanding what the words mean outside of their "poetic" use here. – P. E. Dant Jun 22 '17 at 5:39
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The song you are referring to is a love song and the context of everything within the lyrics is about the love between 2 people.

The definition of fall in this context is

  1. to pass into some physical, mental, or emotional condition:
    to fall asleep; to fall in love.

So the phrase

"We're falling far tonight"

means that that the extent of falling in love is great tonight

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It's hard to say without context.

Literally, "far" just means a long distance, so "falling far" is just falling a long distance.

"Fallen far" (used in the past tense) is sometimes used to describe a loss of prestige or reputation. That meaning is not generally used except in describing something which has already happened, but your passage might be playing on that.

There are also a few biblical references which might fit. The "fall of man" specifically refers to the loss of innocence in the Garden of Eden, and angels can "fall from grace." Either meaning could fit.

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