0

DevStack is the quickest way to get started with OpenStack if you want to kick the tires.

I read a post here, but I don't know the meaning of kick the tires.


I use our country's translation tool, the result is not satisfied.

enter image description here

  • Please use the edit link to tell us about the research you have done to learn the meaning of this expression. It will not benefit you in the long run if we merely tell you what it means. – P. E. Dant Jun 22 '17 at 8:43
  • Your translation tool will not help you to learn English. What research have you done by using English language resources? – P. E. Dant Jun 22 '17 at 8:52
1

The use of kick the tyres in this sentence is an idiomatic phrase.

In order for me to try and explain this fully, here are some pointers you can use when you come across idiomatic phrases like this. Of course you would need to identify that it is idiomatic in the first place, but every time you come across them, you will find it easier to spot them.

Using your example, you could ask yourself

Why would someone kick tyres?
What has that got to do with OpenStack and DevStack?

Some people check car tyres for low pressure by kicking them as a quick way compared to applying a tyre pressure tester. So if it was literally transferred to this sentence it could be seen to mean

DevStack is the quickest way to get started with OpenStack if you want to check your car tyres for low pressure.

But looking at the whole sentence, what could that mean? What has low tyre pressures got to do with everything?

Low tyre pressures will be a problem, so kicking the tyres is looking for problems which could lead to finding punctures or problems with manufacture.

Now this is where context is important. Not knowing the whole story of what is being said, I would read this to mean

DevStack is the quickest way to get started with OpenStack if you want to check for problems/errors.

it could also be understood to mean

DevStack is the quickest way to get started with OpenStack if you want to check for/try/test things.

(in this case things being scripts)

  • 1
    Not only is it an idiomatic phrase, it is also a metaphor. – SteveES Jun 22 '17 at 10:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.