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I am a bit confused.

In dictionary,

class (countable noun): a group of students who are taught together

We’re in the same class for chemistry.

My class are going to the science museum.

Because "class" is a countable noun in this case, so we don't use singular "class" with no article in this meaning

But "He always comes to class late" is not wrong & "class" in this case is a countable or uncountable noun?

But "class" [countable, uncountable]: a period of time during which someone teaches a group of people, especially in a school SYN lesson British English

I missed Bible class last week.

in class (=during the class)

No talking in class!

He was injured in a science class.

I will see you after class

So, do British people say?

I missed Bible lesson last week.

in lesson (=during the lesson)

No talking in lesson! (sounds strange to me)

He was injured in a science lesson.

I will see you after lesson

  • I am struggling to imagine how "I missed Bible class last week." refers to a period of time during the class. I think it means I failed to reach the class on time. – Cardinal Jun 22 '17 at 9:44
  • @Cardinal, "class" in "I missed Bible class last week." is an Uncountable noun – Tom Jun 22 '17 at 10:11
  • Have you tried to look up "lesson"? Also, "Bible lesson" does not mean the same thing as "Bible class". In the UK it would probably be called "Bible study" or "Sunday school" (if it is in a Church and on Sunday). – SteveES Jun 22 '17 at 10:13
  • I know it's uncountable, what I'm saying is that how could you consider that "bible class" refers to a certain period of time. I meant that that refers to the entire time of the class. – Cardinal Jun 22 '17 at 10:55
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As you are probably aware, the English language is not always clear cut.

I can see the confusions you are talking about because as a British person, whilst trying to work out a way to answer the question I came up with some ways in which British English (BrE) and American English (AmE) is interchangable in Britain so it is not straight forward.

In the context you are talking about (studies), as you have seen from the website you linked to, class can refer to

  • a group of students (countable),
    the site indicates class is used in this context in both Bre and AmE
  • a teaching period (which can be countable and uncountable)
    the site indicates class is used in this context in AmE but lesson is used instead in BrE
  • a period of study (countable),
    the site indicates class is used in this context in AmE but course is used instead in BrE

Because of the higher proliferation of AmE being heard and read within Britain compared to the past due to access to American movies (movies being a word also used extensively in BrE as well as the relatively excusive BrE films as an example), there is a lot of interchangeability of words between AmE and BrE within Britain, however some AmE words are not always used within conversation between two BrE people.

In general BrE speech

Group of students

Class is used to refer to a group of students in a teaching environment such as a classroom, however, outside of the classroom environment, this group of students would be referred to as a study group.

Teaching period

Generally speaking, this would be a lesson in BrE.

No talking during the lesson

However, there are times when class is used

No talking in class

I would say the key part of this is when during is used. During class is not generally used in BrE although it would not be unexpected or misunderstood if it was used.

On the question of class or lesson being used in BrE for Bible class in AmE, as far as I am aware, within BrE it is usually Bible lesson or to make things more confusing, Bible study is also used.

As for after class or in your example, after lesson, in BrE it can be either

I will see you after class

or

I will see you after the lesson.

To add to this, you can also use

I will see you after the class/classroom session

or

I will see you after the study session

or

I will see you after study

Period of study

In the website, this is referring to a period where several class sessions are involved.

Course is definitely used in BrE and if you was to refer to a series of classroom or lecture room sessions as one class, this would cause serious confusion here in Britain.

I am a little confused with this as I have not personally heard anyone use the word class to refer to a series of classroom sessions unless they are saying something like

We only have five classes to go 'til the end of the course.

Maybe someone within the AmE community can help with this.

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