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  1. Hilary was talking about the girl (Mimi, whose father is a doctor and only let his girl date young man w/ promising career, especially doctor) whom will had a crush on.

    Hilary: She's been vacuumed more times than a hooked rug.
    Will: She looks good now, right? I don't see your point.
    Hilary: Just wave a chili-cheese dog in front of her nose n see how much of your arm you come back with

    Is Hilary saying that Mimi was a promiscuous girl?? The cheese dog meant "hotdog"?

  2. Will was talking to Carlton about Mimi's type

    Will: Mimi wants a street-wise, Harley, bad-to-the-bones type of guy, man.

    I know Mimi wanted a "bad boy", but what does that "Harley" mean?

  3. Will was exhausted trying to impress both Mimi's father (wanted a good gentleman) and Mimi (wanted a bad boy)

    Will: 'cause, baby. Ain't no girl that fly for me to go through all this trouble for.

    Not sure about the meaning of fly, does that mean girls that fit for Will? and another grammar question, why does this sentence need a "for"?

  • I meant what does "fly for Will" mean.... I know I'm not a native speakers. – Letherette Jmsn Jun 22 '17 at 17:43
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    "There is no girl so beautiful that I will go to all this trouble for her." Please tell us what English dictionary you used to learn about the adjective fly. – P. E. Dant Jun 22 '17 at 17:53
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    @P.E.Dant - C'mon, man, cut the OP some slack. It's one thing to exhort a little research be done in a hastily-asked and scantily-detailed question; it's another to demand to ask where a learner looked up "the adjective fly". Fly in this context is rather newfangled slang that has not yet made its way into some established dictionaries. Put yourself in the shoes of a novice and try to sift through this! This question asks about some very interesting challenges for a learner. – J.R. Jun 22 '17 at 18:39
  • Comments are not for extended discussion; some of this conversation has been moved to chat. – J.R. Jun 22 '17 at 19:07
12

She's been vacuumed more times than a hooked rug
Just wave a chili-cheese dog in front of her nose n see how much of your arm you come back with

Edit: While my original guess on the meaning of these sentences is below, I agree that Adam's interpretation of vacuuming referring to liposuction is correct.

This quote I find the most difficult of the bunch, and others may have different interpretations of this, but I believe what Hillary is getting at here is that Mimi's parents have tried really hard to train her to be prim and proper, but all you have to do is wave a chili-cheese dog in front of her, and she'll bite your whole arm off.

I believe "chili-cheese dog" refers literally to a hotdog topped with chili and cheese, and is not any sort of sexual innuendo. Chili-cheese dogs are hard to eat without making a big mess of yourself. Also, they're not the type of "fancy" food you're likely to find at a five-star restaurant. So the implication is that, if Mimi would bite your arm off just to get a bite of a chili-cheese dog, she's not quite so well-mannered as her father would like her to be.

Mimi wants a street-wise, Harley, bad-to-the-bones type of guy, man.

I believe "Harley" here refers to a Harley Davidson motorcycle. Harleys are supposed to be the motorcycles of bad boys because they're big, loud, and usually black. Contrast that against some brightly-colored electric motorcycle.

'Cause, baby. Ain't no girl that fly for me to go through all this trouble for.

"Fly" here is slang for "cool," basically.

From Dictionary.com's slang definition:

Stylish; very attractive; sharp, superfly

Will is saying that there is no girl in the world who is so cool (or, so attractive to him) that he would go to all this trouble to impress her parents.

The use of the extra "for" at the end of the sentence is debatable. One interpretation is that it's colloquial English, and you could drop it and not change the meaning of the sentence.

Another interpretation is that he's going to all the trouble "for [himself]" – going to the trouble of impressing her dad just to be with her.

A third interpretation is that he's going to the trouble "for [her]" – trying to act like a gentleman to impress her dad so that she will like him because, even though she wants a bad boy, she also wants a guy who will at least pretend to be a gentleman in front of her dad.

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    I'm almost certain vacuumed is a reference to liposuction, a procedure that would not be unfamiliar in Hilary's circles. The implication is that Mimi looks thin, but this is not her "true" self, as she craves unhealthy, fattening foods like the stereotype of a fat person does. The statement is unflattering to the both of them. – choster Jun 22 '17 at 21:01
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    Yes, she eats alot of junk and was fat but had the fat vacuumed out - liposuction. – AbraCadaver Jun 22 '17 at 21:30
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    To everyone above: I agree about the reference to liposuction. I have edited accordingly. What you probably missed in the comment chain from earlier today was a debate about whether this answer should even stay up because I think Adam's answer is more correct too; but it's staying up for the other info it adds, and just to illustrate that even native English speakers sometimes get confused if they don't have enough context :) – cjl750 Jun 22 '17 at 22:09
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    I would argue that the comment part about "Just wave a chilli-dog in front of her nose, and see how much of your arm you get back" is less about manners and more the implication that she would eat both the dog and the arm. She is a person that likes her food. – Sarriesfan Jun 23 '17 at 5:56
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    I think the second for is in order to aquire. – Rawling Jun 23 '17 at 13:46
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  1. She's been vacuumed more times than a hooked rug.

She struggles with her weight and has had liposuction several times.

  1. Mimi wants a street-wise, Harley, bad-to-the-bones type of guy, man.

Mimi wants the type of guy who rides a Harley Davidson motorcycle.

  1. Ain't no girl that fly for me to go through all this trouble for.

Fly is an adjective - "Ain't no girl that fly" = "There is no girl who is so fly..."

The for at the end is a necessary part of the idiomatic expression go to trouble for.

There is no girl who is so hot* that I should go to this amount of trouble for her.

*Hot in the sense of very physically attractive and at least somewhat cool/fun to be with. For more on the meaning of fly see the answers to this question EXCEPT FOR the accepted answer, which comes from a formal dictionary and does not quite match the way that Will is using the word.

  • To clarify - Is the downvote because someone disagrees with the answer, or because they believe I should not have attempted to answer this three part question? – Adam Jun 22 '17 at 18:07
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    @Adam - Who knows why people downvote when they downvote. I think this sort of slang can be vexing for a leaner – even a learner armed with a dictionary – and I think you've done a good job answering this question. +1 from me. – J.R. Jun 22 '17 at 18:33
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    At the time this episode aired, a "fly girl" was a thin, attractive young woman who participated in dance routines during interludes in television shows and other theatrical presentations. The contemporary television show In Living Color had "fly girls" of a variety of races, including multiple black "fly girls". – Jasper Jun 22 '17 at 18:36
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    +1, particularly for what I believe is the correct interpretation of the first quote. However, I feel that "fly" as a synonym for "cool" is a later meaning, adopted after this show originally aired. In 1990-1991, "fly" was generally understood to be "physically attractive". – Beofett Jun 22 '17 at 20:09
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    @Beofett You are totally correct - that word was chosen too hastily. Edited. – Adam Jun 22 '17 at 20:27
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Hilary: She's been vacuumed more times than a hooked rug.

Will: She looks good now, right? I don't see your point.

Hilary: Just wave a chili-cheese dog in front of her nose n see how much of your arm you come back with

Hilary is saying that she has had liposuction (fat removal surgery where fat is literally sucked out of your body) several times. A hooked rug has a lumpy texture that causes it to easily gather dirt/dust, which is removed by vacuuming.

Will then counters by saying it doesn't matter how she got to the physical shape she is, it only matters that she is attractive (thin) now.

Hilary counters that by pointing out that she hasn't changed any of the habits or personality that caused her weight gain, if you were to wave a chili-cheese dog (high calorie food) in front of her, she would eat it so rapidly that she would also accidentally eat part of the hand/arm holding it. (Imagine a large predator such as a lion or shark, if you held food out to one it is easy to imagine that it would take such a large bite that the bite would include part of your hand/arm.)

Will: Mimi wants a street-wise, Harley, bad-to-the-bones type of guy, man.

Harley is a brand of motorcycle primarily associated with "cruiser" style motorcycles (as opposed to "sport bikes"). Bad to the Bone is a common phrase but also the title of a song by George Thorogood and the Destroyers which is associated in popular media with motorcyclists (bikers) who favor cruiser style bikes and dark leather clothing (often with stud or fringe embellishments). (Although, the cruiser style bikers are often white and middle-aged or older, which makes it a humorous choice for Will who is black and young.)

Will: 'cause, baby. Ain't no girl that fly for me to go through all this trouble for.

Other people explained this better than I could, I would just add that fly often means attractive and popular in a setting where the most attractive are typically the most popular and unattractive people are automatically viewed as unpopular.

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    @1006a -- Oh gosh, I read Mimi as Miami and assumed that it was an episode taking place in Miami. Fixing... – user3067860 Jun 23 '17 at 17:09

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