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Let's say, a person shows his feelings too much. He laughs loudly when he is happy. He sobs when something makes him unhappy. I don't want to use 'overreact' for this expression. Is there any idiom?

In my native language, we can describe this person as 'he is living at the edge' which means he overreacts.

  • If you look a technical term, I can suggest "histrionic". However, I am not sure whether it fits your context or not. Also, I guess, "overdramatize" works. The former describes a very severe and exaggerated behavior. – Cardinal Jun 23 '17 at 11:27
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Without overstating the matter, one could say:

he wears his heart on his sleeve

Almost any English user will understand this means the person shows emotions.

  • I learned this idiom as the person is vulnerable and very emotional. Does it have something to do with overreaction ? – Melih Jun 23 '17 at 10:52
  • @ Melih.........One who wears his heart on his sleeve is obvious as to his emotional state, What overreaction might be is probably a matter of opinion. To some, merely showing emotions is overreacting., – J. Taylor Jun 23 '17 at 15:08
  • I don't agree, "wearing your heart on your sleeve" means to be openly emotional not overreacting. – captDaylight Nov 8 '17 at 22:28
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This link has a few, but a few more are:

  • X is a powder keg (in other words, strike a match near a powder keg and it explodes)
  • X has a hair trigger (you pull the trigger to shoot a gun, and a hair trigger means the gun can be fired easily, as if with a hair landing on it)
  • X is touchy (meaning if you touch them, they may not like it)

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