3

I want to describe that the data contains a lot of information. I am considering

  1. lots of information from the data
  2. sufficient information from the data
  3. large information from the data

Am I correct? Do you have other suggestive adjective or phrase can describe that there is a lot of information?

Another question is that can I say "take advantage by doing something"?

2
  • In the vernacular, we say that there is a firehose of data. Commented Jun 23, 2017 at 22:39
  • "Dense" also works, e.g. "A dense report detailed my expenditures down to the last penny," though it may apply more to literature. Also, you may note that "dense" can also be an insult, as it calls someone stupid.
    – aschultz
    Commented Jun 24, 2017 at 5:42

2 Answers 2

1

You could use such words as "wellspring", "depository" or "storehouse":

  • The data is a wellspring of information.
  • The data is a storehouse/depository of information.

You could use the words "loads" or "rich":

  • The data contains loads of information. (informal)
  • The data is rich with information.

You could also use "abundant amount", "bucketload" or "ocean":

  • The data contains abundant amount of information.
  • The data contains a bucketload of information.
  • The data contains an ocean of information.
1

People sometimes refer to data worth looking at as being rich.

With large data sets, you may wish to distinguish between the data that have useful meaning and the data that do not. In the sciences, the useful part of the data (the information) is often called the signal, while the non-useful part of the data is called the noise.

We can then refer to the signal to noise ratio. A rich dataset has a high signal to noise ratio, while a data set that is mostly garbage has a low signal to noise ratio.


As far as your direct question:

  • large information from the data

I have never heard information described as "large."

  • lots of information from the data

This could be fine - depending on the verb that comes before lots.

  • There is [lots / a lot] of information in the data.
  • I extracted [lots / a lot] of information from the data.

I think there is some reason to prefer [a lot of] over [lots of] but I can't remember why. Both expressions are very common.

  • sufficient information from the data

Similar to a lot of, in that the choice of preposition depends on the verb. Different in that sufficient means enough, and is not a synonym of lots.

  • We don't know exactly how efficient this new car is, but I was able to extract sufficient information from the data to know that it is an improvement on the old design.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .