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I am not english native speaker; I am italian.

I couldn't understand meaning "meet" in this context.


As noted in CCP Standard 2.2, the Board operates eight Board-level committees to aid in the discharge of its duties. These committees advise the Board on their relevant area and are governed by their respective charters, which are publicly available on the CME Group website.

The Audit, Compensation, Governance and Nominating committees are solely composed of directors who meet CME Group's published independence standards.

In addition, the Market Regulation Oversight Committee is composed of directors who meet the CFTC's requirements for ‘public’ directors.

  • See sense 4 here. A good answer will explain why this meaning makes sense to native speakers. – Ben Kovitz Jun 25 '17 at 4:23
4

Sometimes it is easier to understand a sentence if we reduce it to a manageable size by replacing long phrases with short words, so that just the "framework" remains. In this case, let's take the original:

The Audit, Compensation, Governance and Nominating committees are solely composed of directors who meet CME Group's published independence standards.

We'll replace Audit, Compensation, Governance and Nominating committees with "teams", and we'll replace CME Group's published independence standards with just "the standards". We'll eliminate the adverb solely, too. This leaves us with:

The teams are composed of directors who meet the standards.

Now that we have trimmed the sentence, we can concentrate on the verb meet. Wiktionary has, as the 4th definition of meet: "To satisfy; to comply with."

Now we can replace meet in the sentence with the definition:

The teams are composed of directors who comply with the standards.

When native speakers use the verb meet in a context like this one, a bit of the more common meaning of the verb is in the back of our minds. When I meet you for coffee, I approach you and move closer to you, until we are face to face. In the same way, in the sentence we are considering, the "teams" are composed of persons whose performance is "face to face" with the expected standards.

2

In your examples, "meet" is used in the sense of "fulfill." In other words, all of the directors on the committees are at least as good or as qualified as the standards specify, and the M.R.O.C. directors are all 'public' directors (or eligible to be 'public' directors).

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When you

meet

someone you usually come face-to-face with them, you are on the same level as they are, eye-to-eye let us say.

People who meet certain criteria are on the same level as the criteria. In your example, that level is the minimum criteria. A person who is exactly at that level is said to

just meet

the criteria. Not to be confused with barely meet or fully meet, the same analogy to meeting person can be extended to those examples also.

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