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I want to understand more about comparison syntax. But I can't find many things about it. So I need your help. Here are some sentences with different position of comparative world.

(1) Children in developed countries are educated better than children in poor countries. ("better" is adv. modifying "educated")

(2) Children in developed countries are better educated than children in poor countries. ("better" is adv. modifying "educated")

(3) I have come up with a sentence including as many verbs with proper form as possible.

(4) I have come up with a sentence including verbs with proper form as many/much as possible. (use "many"(adj) to modify "verbs", and use "much"(adv) to modify "including")

(5) I treasure your effort to give me some sentence with as many verbs in different verb form as possible.

(6) I treasure your effort to give me some sentence with verbs in different verb form as many/much as possible. ("much" is considered to be adverb modifying "give", and "many"(adj) modifies "verbs")

I wonder if there is any misunderstanding? if yes, please show me the problem. And do you think these pairs of sentences (1)and(2), (3)and(4), and (5)and(6) are correct and the same meaning in each pair?

I hope to receive your advice. Many thanks for your time

closed as too broad by P. E. Dant, Em., user3169, Ben Kovitz, Chenmunka Jun 26 '17 at 9:33

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Welcome to ELL, and thank you for your question. Unfortunately, there are too many questions here, and there are many errors in your sentences. Please use the edit link to ask just one question. Our tour and Help Center pages, and our Details, Please meta post, will help you. You can ask more questions, and we hope you do! – P. E. Dant Jun 25 '17 at 19:14
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Sometimes word order can subtly influence the meaning conveyed. I think your examples 1 and 2 for instance are both correct but are slightly different in meaning.

If the children are "better educated" -- which could also be written "better-educated" -- this describes their condition at the end of the process, i.e. they end up in a state of educatedness which is superior.

If they are "educated better" this seems to emphasize the delivery of education, that is, that they are being given an education which is judged to be superior.

Of course, there should be some relationship between the two -- if they are educated better, you would hope they would become better educated! Nevertheless there is a difference of nuance.

  • How do better educated and educated better differ? Does the adjective better modify the same word in both sentences? Is educated a past participle or an adjective in sentence1? In sentence 2? – P. E. Dant Jun 25 '17 at 19:26
  • I get what you’re getting at: a person can be better educated while a school can educate better. – J.R. Jun 26 '17 at 10:58

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