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Does it mean "That is something bad for the banking system"? https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/bankster

The credit-to-GDP gap has reached a critical level in Canada. The BIS defines this as the “difference of the credit-to-GDP ratio from its trend.” That’s bankster for “it compares credit consumption to the output of the economy.” If the level is too high, the amount of private credit is “unjustified.” The lower the number, the more credit can be “safely” consumed. BIS considers anything above 2 to be a strong gap, and anything above 10 to be a critical warning. Breaching 10 results in a banking crisis in two-thirds of economies, within three years.

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/canada-financial-crisis-warning-signs-2017-6

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"Bankster" is a deprecating term for an immoral/criminal person working in banking.

In this sentence it is used as a mock name for a language, the language/jargon spoken by "banksters" and in banking.

With natural languages you could say: "Haus. That's German for 'house'". Here one term in banking jargon is "translated" into regular English.

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    Might be worth mentioning that it's a portmanteau of banker + gangster. – LMS Jun 29 '17 at 11:25
  • @Weathervane: Sorry, I still can't get what you mean. – haile Jun 29 '17 at 15:37
  • @haile: You could (clumsily) reformulate the sentence like this: The BIS defines this as the “difference of the credit-to-GDP ratio from its trend.” This is a banking term for: “it compares credit consumption to the output of the economy.” Does this help? – Weathervane Jun 29 '17 at 15:51

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