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The press more often than not focuses on animals well-known.

this sentence is so tricky that I do not understand why the word "than" stand in this position. And the meaning make me confused too.

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  • I assume your sentence is incomplete - it isn't particularly common to phrase things '... animals well-known'. It should be: 'The press more often than not focuses on well-known animals'. Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 16:12
  • 'More often than not' is an idiom meaning strictly 'on over 50% of occasions' but pragmatically used, like 'most often', for percentages round about 70-80. Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 16:33

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the press more often than not focuses on animals well-known

Replace "more often than not" with the word "usually" and you'll get the meaning.

It'll then be

the press usually focuses on animals well-known

Read more on ODO.

Or, as Hank suggests, you could also rearrange "well-known" this way

the press usually focuses on well-known animals

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