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I'm wondering whether "or not" can be omitted in an adverbial clause headed by "whether". Which of the following is correct?

  1. Whether he knows Peter personally or not, he will visit him today.
  2. Whether he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today.
  3. No matter whether he knows Peter personally or not, he will visit him today.
  4. No matter whether he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today.
  5. No matter if he knows Peter personally or not, he will visit him today.
  6. No matter if he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today.

Inputs from native speakers would be highly appreciated.

  • 1
    #2 is completely non-idiomatic, because we normally expect that when whether is used in such contexts, there will be an associated or not. Personally, I don't like any of your no matter variants much. I'd use regardless of whether, which seems fine to me regardless of whether you explicitly mention the alternative [or not!]. To my ear, #6 is actually a slightly less idiomatic version of [It is] no matter that he knows Peter (i.e. - implying that he does know him, but this doesn't matter / isn't important in the context of the visit). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jul 4 '17 at 13:24
  • I'd say you can't drop or not in that use. It's not required in sentences like I'm not sure whether [or not] she'll be there, which means that Regardless of whether he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today is OK, even though it means the sane as Whether or not he knows Peter personally, he wil visit hin today. – user96060 May 30 at 5:31
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In some situations,

Whether he knows Peter personally or not, he will visit him today.

might be considered correct. However, I would prefer to say

Whether or not he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today.

The second one is incorrect. As for the third one, No matter whether or not he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today sounds better to me. But you may omit or not if you wish and it will still be correct.

No matter whether he knows Peter personally, he will visit him today

I personally would not use "No matter if..."

I hope this helps.

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