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sometimes I hear Americans pronounce jury as ''/dʒɜːri/''. Is that right? Is it regional or generally they say this way?

  • It's what's called nursing the cure (look it up). – Void Sep 30 at 9:33
  • Until you asked, I (AmE speaker) didn’t know there was any other way to pronounce it. Accents are like that. – StephenS Oct 9 at 22:40
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Maybe no Australians say jury with the NORTH/FORCE vowel, but some Brits do. A 1998 poll of British speakers reported in Wells (2000) shows 77% prefer /dʒʊəri/, 13% prefer /dʒɜːri/ (surprisingly enough; I thought that was a uniquely North American pronunciation), and 10% prefer /dʒɔːri/. Among those born since 1973, the numbers are about 55%, 25%, 20% respectively. --Angr/tɔk tə mi 08:08, 25 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Wikipedia article

The common American way is [ˈdʒʊri] and the British is [ˈdʒʊəri]

Cambridge definition

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CURE represents /ʊə/ and NURSE represents /ɜː/ in John Wells Standard Lexical Sets for English

sometimes I hear Americans pronounce jury as ''/dʒɜːri/''. Is that right?

Yes, most American and some British accents have reduced the CURE vowel to the NURSE vowel and it is what's called Nursing the cure.
For 'jury', Merriam-Webster gives /ˈjər-ē/ as an alternative pronunciation.
For 'cure', Merriam-Webster gives /ˈkyər/ as an alternative pronunciation.

The /ə/ and the NURSE vowel /ɜ/ are both central vowels are interchangeable for some people.
According to Wikipedia, it's probably because of the following /r/.

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