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I read an article by Margarette Driscoll, there are parts that I don't understand. I would appreciate it if you could help me.

Two hundred years ago, all the women might have been trudging down the lane from the manor house bearing a basket of goodies for the poor. These days, they can jet to their particular good cause and—who would deny them this?—pick up more than a little caring cachet en route.

I need to know the meaning of the last sentence. "Pick up....." Thanks a billion

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  • What is the source? As written, the spacing and punctuation needs to be cleaned up a bit.
    – user3169
    Jul 4, 2017 at 18:38
  • Nice find in terms of a highly idiomatic passage with lots of terms that are hard to find in textbooks! :) Here "cachet" means prestige or reputation (Wiktionary). "caring cachet" would be "an aura/reputation of being caring (people)". Jul 4, 2017 at 20:15

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Interesting example, talking about helping the poor or charities.

Two hundred years ago, all the women might have been trudging down the lane
A long time ago, before the age of social media, one might walk down the road

from the manor house bearing a basket of goodies for the poor.
from one's privileged life to help the poor (and this act would go unnoticed).

These days, they can jet to their particular good cause
in these modern days of fast transport, one can support their favorite cause

and — who would deny them this?—pick up more than a little caring cachet en route.
and - who would blame them - get credit and attention for helping and caring

The implication of the article may be that those who might be attention seeking have the tools these days to tell the world about what they are doing, and may be motivated more by the attention (Facebook "likes") than by the act of giving.

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  • Thank you very much. I really got the point. You saved me! I went through a lot of difficulties to find the answer. I gain thank you wholeheartedly. Jul 5, 2017 at 22:25
  • Keep studying and you will know it on your own!
    – Peter
    Jul 6, 2017 at 3:43

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