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What is the difference between in the meaning of these two sentences:

  • I will remember to post the letter.
  • I will remember posting the letter.

How can we know where to use gerund or infinitive?
Are there any specific verbs that can be used particularly for gerund and infinitive separately?

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    In the first example, it is an action that has not yet been fulfilled. The second is foresight of hindsight (which is about as confusing as it sounds) - they know they will look back on the time when they posted the letter. – marcellothearcane Jul 4 '17 at 13:43
  • Also, your question is a little unclear. What do you mean by 'Are there specific verbs for these?' – marcellothearcane Jul 4 '17 at 13:44
  • Really Thanks for your response. Can you please elaborate the second example, I didn't get it. I meant to say, are there any specific verbs that can be used particularly for gerund and infinvite separately? – user223434 Jul 4 '17 at 13:49
  • At this point, they have not had the experience, but they know that they will remember doing it. For example, 'I will remember doing this for the rest of my life', they haven't done it yet, but they know it will be momentous enough for them to look back on it. Hope that's clearer! – marcellothearcane Jul 4 '17 at 13:53
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    As for the verbs, yes, there are special verbs. Every verb in English is special, in the sense that it has its own list of requirements, prohibitions, and options. They all have to be learned individually, though they fall together into semantic groups, like the sense verbs, which can take any kind of complement, with almost no difference in meaning. – John Lawler Jul 4 '17 at 16:36
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I will remember to post the letter.
I will remember posting the letter.

How can we know where to use gerund or infinitive? Are there any specific verbs that can be used particularly for gerund and infinvite separately?

It's as already noted above by John Lawler, and Michael Swan says in his Practical English Usage as follows:

§296
1 verbs that can be followed by -ing forms
It is best to check in a good dictionary.

Roughly, to-infinitives have the sense of purpose.

something you have to do
5 [transitive] to not forget to do something; to actually do what you have to do
- Remember to call me when you arrive! (Oxford Learner's Dictionary | remember)

The -ing form when used an object usually has more sense of noun than the to-infinitive.

someone or something from the past
2 [transitive, intransitive] to have or keep an image in your memory of an event, a person, a place, etc. from the past
remember doing something
- Do you remember turning the lights off before we came out? (Oxford Learner's Dictionary | remember)

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