3

In my grammar book there is the following example:

It is not wise for you to go back home. You'll meet a nice boy here, you'll settle down, GET a nice flat and you'll get everything you want and deserve.

I don't understand why GET is in the Present Simple, and not in the Future Simple. English.Page.com says that Future Simple is also used in the following:

Both "will" and "be going to" can express the idea of a general prediction about the future. Predictions are guesses about what might happen in the future. In "prediction" sentences, the subject usually has little control over the future …

Can someone please explain why GET and not WILL GET was used?

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  • It actually implies "(you'll) get a nice flat". – BlackSwan Jul 3 '17 at 10:15
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The "get" in this passage is an infinitive, not the present simple.

It means "will get"; the word "will" isn't used before it because it already occured earlier in the sentence. I think this is called "conjunction reduction".

Here is the same sentence substituting "she" for "you":

She'll meet a nice boy here, she'll settle down, GET (not "gets"!) a nice flat and she'll get everything she wants and deserves.

3

That is quite a confusing example from your grammar textbook. Normally you'd make this into a list and not repeat "you'll" every time. So

You'll meet a nice boy, settle down, get a nice flat and get everything you want"

would be parsed as:

You'll:

  • meet a nice boy
  • settle down
  • get a nice flat
  • and get everything you want

or, rephrased:

  • You'll meet a nice boy

  • You'll settle down

  • You'll get a nice flat

  • And you'll get everything you want

I think the textbook author, because of other words (bolded below), feels the list is broken twice. After each break, the author feels the need to reintroduce "you'll":

  • You'll meet a nice boy here, you'll settle down, get a nice flat and you'll get everything you want and deserve.

I agree with the author that after "here" it sound slightly better to reintroduce "you'll", but not after "and". In fact, using another "and" in "everything you want and deserve" makes the sentence scan quote poorly anyway.

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