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Harry : "Why would you be mad to try and rob Gringotts(Wizards' bank)?"

Hagrid : "Spells-enchantments," said Hagrid, unfolding his newspaper as he spoke. "They say there's dragons guardin' the high-security vaults. And then yeh gotta find yer way - Gringotts is hundreds of miles under London, see. Deep under the Underground. Yeh'd die of hunger tryin' ter get out, even if yeh did manage ter get yer hands on summat."

This is from Harry potter and I don't understand the meaning of that highlighted phrase. I mean, I do know the meaning of 'find someone's way' literally, but I don't know WHY is Hagrid saying that. Is it like "You'll be able to find out how you can get there, Harry."? ... It's like an irrelevant phrase in my opinion and It seems more natural without it..

I looked up the dictionary and found another meaning : come to a place or a situation by chance or without intending to, but I guess it's not appropriate here, neither..

Is this kind of confusion also because of my lack of english? or is it just my lack of understanding in reading?

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    The phrase is used literally here. Hagrid describes Gringotts as a huge and very complicated structure. It would be easy to get lost in it. So, if you wanted to rob a vault, you would first have to locate it - that is, "find your way" to it. – Weathervane Jul 6 '17 at 6:58
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    "And then you have to find your way." It's fiction. It's not a school textbook. It is supposed to represent the way people spoke in that place, at that time. It's part of a story, an amusement. People often interject "irrelevant phrases" when they speak. I'm sure that writers also tell stories in your own language! – P. E. Dant Jul 6 '17 at 7:01
  • I think this question belongs elsewhere. It's not about learning English. – SovereignSun Jul 6 '17 at 8:32
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Hagrid is describing three different obstacles that make it "mad" to think of robbing the Goblin bank Gringotts. First he mentions magical security ("spells-enchantments"), and then guardians ("dragons"). The third obstacle to a robber is the location itself - because Gringotts is "hundreds of miles under London", it would be difficult to escape.

The way Hagrid explains this is indirect and unclear. The sentence you highlighted is deliberately written to make Hagrid sound like someone who does not speak standard English well. If we were to "translate" it into standard English, the sentence becomes:

And then yeh gotta find yer way - Gringotts is hundreds of miles under London, see.

Then, you must find your way - Gringotts is hundreds of miles under London.

In this case, the obstacle is the difficulty in finding your way (i.e., navigating, discovering a safe path) because the location is so far underground. He goes on to elaborate:

Deep under the Underground. Yeh'd die of hunger tryin' ter get out, 
even if yeh did manage ter get yer hands on summat.

[The location is] deep under the [London] Underground. You would die 
of hunger trying to get out, even if you did manage to get your hands 
on something [valuable from the Gringotts vault].

I have added some details that Hagrid left unspoken. If you take the last three sentences together and fill in the blanks, it becomes more clear. Again, this is a case of the author choosing to make Hagrid deliberately difficult to understand to illustrate that Hagrid is from a different social class and background than most other characters.

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