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For example, “She has a big blue book” can be said as “She has a big and blue book”, so you cannot use a hyphen between “big” and “blue.” As a counter example, "He is a world-famous singer" cannot be said as "He is a world and famous singer", so you should join the words with a hyphen.

I am writing the sentence above, but cannot come up with an appropriate expression to alternatively use in the place of the bold-faced one. I googled the expression as a counter example, but I think this expression is maybe so uncommon that little articles used such an expression. Can anyone recommend some expressions that I can use instead of that?

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    Come to think of it, simple Conversely might work in that place. – Gwangmu Lee Jul 6 '17 at 10:50
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    A counterexample is one that argues against a point, so it wouldn't quite work here. If you were to go that route you'd have to say "As an example of the other kind" or something equally verbose. – Luke Sawczak Jul 6 '17 at 12:26
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Use conversely as @Gwangmu Lee you suggests suggested, or the phrase on the other hand.

For example, “She has a big blue book” can be said as “She has a big and blue book”, so you cannot use a hyphen between “big” and “blue.” { Conversely | On the other hand }, "He is a world-famous singer" cannot be said as "He is a world and famous singer", so you should join the words with a hyphen.

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    Note that the commenter you cite is the OP himself :) P.S. Another favourite option of mine is "whereas". And of course simply "but" and "however" usually suit, although they require a little more effort on the reader's part to figure out where the contrast lies... – Luke Sawczak Jul 6 '17 at 12:24
  • @LukeSawczak doesn't the contrast lie in the preceding sentence? If the readers don't understand it, then even conversely or on the other hand couldn't help. – Ooker Jul 6 '17 at 13:31
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    @Ooker "Conversely" is a nice, exact word used to show the other side of the coin, an example of a different kind. "But" can mean that, or it could introduce a reason why the former observation is wrong. It has more functions, so it requires more careful reading to know which one is intended. – Luke Sawczak Jul 6 '17 at 13:59

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